John Colby
Colby Realty | 978-249-5871 | [email protected]


Posted by John Colby on 6/14/2020

Image by Burst from Pexels

Buying a home is an exciting time. As you start to comb through listings and decide you’re ready to take the plunge to purchase, you’ll want to pursue getting pre-approved for a mortgage. This way, you'll know how much you're approved for and can shop for homes within your price range. Additionally, having a pre-approval boosts your chances of having your offer accepted once you’ve found a house you want to buy. If you aren't already pre-approved, this delays your ability to put in a bid, which means someone else may be the one moving into your dream home.

To get yourself qualified for a mortgage, it’s a good idea to shop around for rates. Many people find they do best with a credit union, however, there are some drawbacks you might want to consider before making your decision of the type of lender you want to work with.

Credit Unions Require a Membership

Unlike traditional banks, credit unions aren’t open to everyone to use. To apply for a mortgage through a credit union, you’ll have to join as a member. The drawback is not just anyone can join. To qualify for membership, you’ll have to be affiliated with a specified organization or meet other designated criteria set by the credit union’s guidelines.

Many people find they are successfully able to locate a credit union they are eligible to join, but it’s not a given. To check to see if you meet the criteria for membership to a credit union near you, check MyCreditunion.gov.

Fewer Branch Networks

Credit unions are community-based non-credit entities. As a result, most of them are geographically concentrated and operate with fewer branches than traditional banks. This means your options may be extremely limited if you want in-person service.

Having a physical branch to visit when you want to resolve problems is a convenience many people often want when working with a financial institution. Consider how important this access to your lender would be to you. If you’re comfortable with strictly phone contact or online options (which might also be limited, depending on the size of the credit union), in-person access may not be an issue for you.

Limited Financing Options

Larger commercial banks typically have a broad range of financing options. While you might find a good rate at a credit union, you’ll typically find far fewer product offerings than you would at a larger bank.

Depending on your individual credit and financial standing, a credit union may not be able to offer you the best interest rates on a mortgage. Additionally, since they are smaller entities, they don’t always have nearly as much cash on hand as traditional banks, which means they might be limited in the number of mortgages they can approve at a given time.

When shopping for lenders to pre-approve you for a mortgage, you have many options between traditional banks, credit unions, mortgage banks and mortgage brokers. If you diligently do your homework, it’ll empower you to find a lender that can meet your financing needs.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by John Colby on 5/10/2020

Image by Ulrike Mai from Pixabay

If you're considering getting into the world of real estate investing, there are some basic terms that are important to understand. Buying and selling property is, of course, one way to invest, but there are other investments that offer favorable returns. However, it can sometimes be difficult to master the confusing alphabet soup of investment opportunity.

Packaged investment products include the Asset-Backed Security (ABS) and a Collateral Debt Obligation (CDO). In some ways, they are similar; each is typically bundled as a group investment for marketing purposes. Financial return is realized as payments are made by the pool of consumers included in the group. 

The ABS evolved historically, beginning in the 1980s, with the lender practice of bundling mortgage-backed securities for resale, primarily to other institutions. Today the practice continues, but mortgage debt is classified as a CDO, with specific real estate as the collateral. It is a specialty designation under the umbrella of asset-backed securities. The breakdown can be complex, and terms are sometimes confusing.

Financing that comprises CDO debt includes all the underlying characteristics of the ABS, in addition to the specialized assets of both commercial and residential Mortgage-Backed Security (MBS) or REIT (Real Estate Investment Trust) debt. A unique type of CDO that only includes mortgages is known as a CMO, referring to Collateralized Mortgage Obligation. 

Most investors really don't need to know more, but there are other designations that are commonly used:

  • A CLO is the term for Collateralized (Bank) Loan Obligation;
  • A CBO designates a Bond Obligation;
  • Credit-backed debt is sometimes referred to as synthetic CDO to distinguish it from cash-backed debt.

Various types of CDO debt are batched into three (or more) classes, known as tranches, with varying degrees of risk and return. Although the maturity level may be the same, an Equity Tranch investment offers the highest potential return but bears the lowest credit rating. A less-risky Senior Tranch boasts a higher credit rating, and the Mezzanine Tranch is in the middle.

Typically, an ABS investment package comprises credit card debt, student loan debt, home equity loans, auto loans, and large sum debt-repayment contracts for other goods, with no mortgages in the package. 

An investor in either an ABS or CDO earns a return, in part or in full, as the pool of debt is repaid by the individuals whose loans have been pooled. The risk of default is spread over the spectrum of loans, and investor risk is assessed, largely in proportion to the number and type of loans included in the package. 

These various types of investment packages are usually marketed only to institutions, rather than to individual investors, however there are ways for individual investors to purchase shares through the investment firm.





Posted by John Colby on 12/1/2019

For those who want to acquire a house, it helps to get your finances in order. That way, you can quickly and effortlessly navigate the homebuying journey without having to worry about how you'll afford your dream house.

There are many quick, easy ways to straighten out your finances before you embark on the homebuying journey, such as:

1. Assess Your Credit Score

Your credit score ultimately can play a major role in your ability to secure a great mortgage. If you understand your credit score, you may be able to find ways to improve it prior to conducting a home search.

It is important to remember that you are entitled to a free copy of your credit report annually from each of the credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion). Request a free copy of your credit report today, and you can take the first step to evaluate your credit score.

If you find that your credit score is low, there is no need to worry. You can always pay off outstanding debt to improve your credit score over time.

Also, if you identify any errors on your credit report, you'll want to address these mistakes immediately. In this scenario, you should contact the agency that provided the report to ensure any necessary corrections can be made.

2. Look Closely at Your Monthly Expenses

When it comes to buying a house, it generally helps to have sufficient funds for a down payment. The down payment on a house may fall between 5 and 20 percent of a home's sale price, so you'll want to have enough money available to cover this total for your dream residence.

If you evaluate your monthly expenses, you may be able to find ways to save money for a down payment on a house.

For example, it may be beneficial to cut out cable TV for the time being and use the money that you save toward a home down payment. Or, if your dine out frequently, cooking at home may prove to be a substantial money-saver that could help you speed up the process of saving for a down payment.

3. Get Pre-Approved for a Mortgage

With pre-approval for a mortgage, you can enter the housing market with a budget in hand. Then, you'll be better equipped than ever before to narrow your search to houses that fall within your price range.

To get pre-approved for a mortgage, you'll want to meet with banks and credit unions. These financial institutions can teach you about different mortgage options and help you assess all of the options at your disposal.

Furthermore, don't hesitate to ask banks and credit unions about how different types of mortgages work. This will enable you to gain the insights that you need to make an informed decision about a mortgage based on your financial situation.

If you need extra help as you prepare to pursue a house, you may want to hire a real estate agent as well. In fact, a real estate agent can help you find a high-quality house at a budget-friendly price in no time at all.




Categories: Uncategorized  




Tags