John Colby
Colby Realty | 978-249-5871 | [email protected]


Posted by John Colby on 5/31/2020

Photo by Bonnie Kittle on Unsplash

Tired of looking at a dated bathroom day after day but dread updating it knowing the average remodeled bathroom will set you back thousands of dollars? Even if you don’t have the budget for a complete makeover, there are several DIY ways you can update your bathroom.

1. Paint Tub & Tile

For many homeowners, the most outdated area of their bathrooms is the tub and shower. The good news is if your tub and tiles are in good shape, you don’t necessarily need to remove them—simply give them a refresh.

  • Thoroughly clean tub and tile.
  • Purchase a prepackaged tub and tile kit—it’ll give you a list of supplies and tools and the right epoxy, along with detailed instructions.
  • Sand down all tub and tile surfaces so you establish a good clean base for adhesion.
  • Use quality paint designed for this type of project.
  • Thoroughly ventilate your working area.
  • Give your tub a good amount of curing time before running a bath.

This project is a little trickier than simply painting walls, but with patience and know-how, you can give your old bathroom a completely brand-new look.

2. Refinish a Dated Vanity

If your bathroom vanity looks like it came straight out of the 1980s, you can easily remedy this by refinishing it.

  • Remove all hardware, drawers and the cabinet door; put them aside to paint separately.
  • Gently sand down the vanity's surface and then clean off any dirt, dust or grime.
  • Using smooth strokes with a brush or roller (you can test to see which looks better), paint the vanity’s surface and let it thoroughly dry.

Once your newly painted drawers and cabinet door are completely dry, reattach your hardware and add on some sparkling new knobs. Voila!

3. Update Your Lighting

Many homeowners find they can easily swap out old fixtures for new ones and see their bathrooms in a whole new light. Or you can get crafty and create your own. Popular styles include:

  • Pendant lights.
  • Mason jar sconces.
  • 3 or 4 bulb bath bar.
  • Lighting can make or break a room. If you're seeking a more modern look, look to change out your fixtures.

    4. Create a Unique Bathmat

    Sometimes it’s the simple touches that add flair to a room. One easy thing you can do is ditch the regular bathmat and create one out of cedar strips. Cedar is great since it’s water-resistant and it gives your bathroom a spa-like vibe. You’ll need a 1x6x10 cedar board, measuring tape, circular saw, table saw, wood glue and teak oil.

  • Cut your board into three pieces with your circular saw for the desired length.
  • Using the remaining wood, cut out three support pieces.
  • Thoroughly sand all pieces and then position them to your liking.
  • Glue pieces in the position you choose and then nail them together.
  • Once you’ve put your cedar bath mat together, allow it time to completely dry before using it.

    Giving your old bathroom a facelift, or even some new bling, can do wonders for its appearance. Identify your pain points, apply an update and see what a difference even the smallest changes can make.





    Posted by John Colby on 5/24/2020

    As a home seller, you'll likely want to do whatever you can to promote your house to the right groups of homebuyers. Thus, hosting an open house is a must, particularly for a seller who wants to enjoy a fast, profitable home selling experience.

    Ultimately, there are many reasons to conduct an open house, and these include:

    1. You can stir up interest in your house.

    An open house enables you to provide homebuyers with an up-close look at your residence. It allows these buyers to look beyond a home listing, and as such, may lead to many potential offers on your home.

    Of course, an open house empowers you to show off the true size and beauty of your home as well. If you allocate the necessary time and resources to clean your home prior to an open house, you may increase the likelihood of securing offers at the event's conclusion.

    2. You can respond to homebuyers' questions.

    Although a home listing may include details about your house's age and condition, it fails to provide homebuyers with a "feel" of what it's like to walk around inside and outside your residence. Fortunately, an open house allows buyers to get a first-hand look at your residence and determine whether your house matches or exceeds their expectations.

    Furthermore, an open house provides homebuyers with the opportunity to ask questions about your house. And if you provide buyers with the information they request, you can make it easy for them to decide whether to submit an offer on your home.

    3. You can analyze homebuyers' interest in your residence.

    Believe it or not, an open house can help you gauge the effectiveness of your marketing efforts.

    For instance, an open house that features dozens of potential buyers likely can be considered a resounding success. On the other hand, if no buyers attend your open house, you may need to reevaluate your home's initial asking price and other home selling factors.

    When it comes to hosting an open house, there is a lot to consider. Luckily, you can work with a real estate agent to streamline the process of putting together a successful open house.

    A real estate agent is a home selling guide who can offer expert tips and insights at each stage of the home selling journey. He or she will learn about your residence and help you map out a successful home selling plan. Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent will set up open houses, help you assess offers on your residence and ensure you can make the best-possible decisions throughout the home selling process.

    If you're worried about hosting an open house, there is no need to stress. Hire a real estate agent today, and you'll be able to receive comprehensive home selling support. In fact, with a real estate agent at your disposal, you can seamlessly navigate the home selling cycle.




    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by John Colby on 5/17/2020

    If you’re planning on buying a home in the near future and are confused about many of the terms associated with mortgages, you’re not alone. Real estate is its own industry with its own set of processes, terms, and acronyms. If you’re new to the home buying process, there can be somewhat of a learning curve to understand what each of these terms means.

    Since buying a home is such a huge investment and life decision, there’s a lot of pressure on home buyers to make sure they get everything right. This makes for a stressful situation for buyers who don’t feel like they understand the terminology of things like mortgages, appraisals, credit reports, and other factors that contribute to the home buying process.

    To alleviate some of those concerns and to make the home buying process run more smoothly, we’ve compiled a list of the most common, and most commonly confused, real estate words, terms, and acronyms. That way, when you’re talking things over with your real estate agent or your mortgage lender, you’ll be confident that you understand exactly what’s being considered.


    Read on for our real estate terminology glossary.

    • Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) - This is one type of home loan. Mortgage rates with this type of loan fluctuate throughout the repayment term of the loan. The fluctuation is based on a market indicator.

    • Fixed rate mortgage (FRM) - Another type of home loan, a fixed rate mortgage has a rate which does not fluctuate, remaining constant for the life of the term, most commonly 15 or 30 years.

    • Appraisal - An appraisal is the determination of the value of a property. Appraisals are used when purchasing and selling a home, as well as when refinancing a home loan. Appraisers are required to be licensed or certified in each state and are usually paid for by the lender.

    • Appreciation - An increase in a property’s value, most commonly due to market inflation, or the general increase in home prices over time.

    • Depreciation - A decrease in a property’s value, due to either market deflation (uncommon) or the wear and tear on a home that comes with age.

    • Closing costs - The costs and fees that a buyer is responsible for when purchasing a home or taking out a mortgage. These include underwriting fees, inspections, appraisals, transfer taxes, and more. Closing costs typically range from 2% to 5% of the total loan amount.

    • Contingency - Home purchases have contracts to protect the interest of the buyer, seller, and lender. Contingencies are provisions designed to protect the buyer or lender should something occur in the time leading up to closing on (or purchasing) the home. One common contingency is the buyer’s right to have a final inspection of the home before closing to ensure no new issues with the home have occurred.

    • Private mortgage insurance (PMI) - Buyers who cannot afford a down payment of %20 typically are required to take out a private mortgage insurance policy. This policy protects the lender should the borrower default (fail to repay or meet the conditions of their loan).






    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by John Colby on 5/13/2020

    This Single-Family in Templeton, MA recently sold for $359,900. This Colonial style home was sold by John Colby - Colby Realty.


    24 Victoria Lane, Templeton, MA 01468

    Templeton

    Single-Family

    $359,900
    Price
    $359,900
    Sale Price

    7
    Rooms
    3
    Beds
    2/1
    Full/Half Baths
    Location, Location !!...Just over a mile to the New Templeton Elementary School this well cared for home sits proudly on 1 acre with a Southern Exposure in "Cook Pond Estates" ! Built in 2006 with many upgrades This Oversized Colonial has 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths and is designed w/ full Energy Efficiency Pkg. incl Fantastic Hydro Air Heating & Central Air Conditioning for your 4 Season comfort ! More floor space means you get a Formal Dining Room ! Great Natural lighting & Hardwood floors throughout the 1st floor . Ceramic tiled Open Concept Kitchen w breakfast bar ! Rear Sliders lead to the Exterior deck & above ground pool ! ..Enjoy the Vaulted Ceilings in the Spacious 1st floor Media room (Could be a 4th bedroom).Quality Thermal Windows are Tilt in for EZ Cleaning. Master Bedroom has Walk in closet & Full Jacuzzi Bath ! Large Level yard , Unfinished full basement,Underground utilities ,Town Water & Sewer ! Larger 2 car garage/work area New Commuter Rail Stop @ nearby Wachusett

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    Categories: Sold Homes  


    Posted by John Colby on 5/10/2020

    Image by Ulrike Mai from Pixabay

    If you're considering getting into the world of real estate investing, there are some basic terms that are important to understand. Buying and selling property is, of course, one way to invest, but there are other investments that offer favorable returns. However, it can sometimes be difficult to master the confusing alphabet soup of investment opportunity.

    Packaged investment products include the Asset-Backed Security (ABS) and a Collateral Debt Obligation (CDO). In some ways, they are similar; each is typically bundled as a group investment for marketing purposes. Financial return is realized as payments are made by the pool of consumers included in the group. 

    The ABS evolved historically, beginning in the 1980s, with the lender practice of bundling mortgage-backed securities for resale, primarily to other institutions. Today the practice continues, but mortgage debt is classified as a CDO, with specific real estate as the collateral. It is a specialty designation under the umbrella of asset-backed securities. The breakdown can be complex, and terms are sometimes confusing.

    Financing that comprises CDO debt includes all the underlying characteristics of the ABS, in addition to the specialized assets of both commercial and residential Mortgage-Backed Security (MBS) or REIT (Real Estate Investment Trust) debt. A unique type of CDO that only includes mortgages is known as a CMO, referring to Collateralized Mortgage Obligation. 

    Most investors really don't need to know more, but there are other designations that are commonly used:

    • A CLO is the term for Collateralized (Bank) Loan Obligation;
    • A CBO designates a Bond Obligation;
    • Credit-backed debt is sometimes referred to as synthetic CDO to distinguish it from cash-backed debt.

    Various types of CDO debt are batched into three (or more) classes, known as tranches, with varying degrees of risk and return. Although the maturity level may be the same, an Equity Tranch investment offers the highest potential return but bears the lowest credit rating. A less-risky Senior Tranch boasts a higher credit rating, and the Mezzanine Tranch is in the middle.

    Typically, an ABS investment package comprises credit card debt, student loan debt, home equity loans, auto loans, and large sum debt-repayment contracts for other goods, with no mortgages in the package. 

    An investor in either an ABS or CDO earns a return, in part or in full, as the pool of debt is repaid by the individuals whose loans have been pooled. The risk of default is spread over the spectrum of loans, and investor risk is assessed, largely in proportion to the number and type of loans included in the package. 

    These various types of investment packages are usually marketed only to institutions, rather than to individual investors, however there are ways for individual investors to purchase shares through the investment firm.







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